Sneak peek at Marion Pool redevelopment

Sneak peek at Marion Pool redevelopment

marion waterpark redevelopment

 

The Marion outdoor pool is going to be bigger and better than ever!

 

Marion Council has announced that work has begun on the transformation of the 44-year old Marion pool into the biggest outdoor water park in Southern Adelaide. The redevelopment will upgrade the pool to a $4.5m water park, and we. can. not. wait!!!

The new improvements include:

Water play park with:

  • 9.2 metre high x 20 metre wide centrepiece with four water slides, including one enclosed slide, tipping bucket containing 600 litres of water , and water cannons
  • 59 sqm splash pad with non-slip surface, water jets and interactive features.

Expanding the site size site by 1800 sqm to create a family area with:

  • Three new barbecues
  • Three new shade structures
  • Picnic areas

Landscaping upgrades:

  • New paths across the site to improve access for people of all abilities
  • Disability access drinking fountain

New play equipment will also be installed.

All current activities, including lap swimming, aqua aerobics, swim school, open day, swimming tuition, carnivals, events, and VACSWIM will continue – but in an improved in environment.

The new look pool and family facility is hoping to open in early October ready for a summer of fun!

For more information:

marion.sa.gov.au

 

 

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Start your engines! The first major South Australian Museum opens TODAY at 10am!

Start your engines! The first major South Australian Museum opens TODAY at 10am!

national motor museum

Get into gear, strap the kids car seats in and hit the road friends; The History Trust of South Australia’s National Motor Museum will re-open its doors to visitors today at 10am.

It will be the first major South Australian Museum to open its doors.

This is part of the South Australian Governments Step 2 Roadmap to Recovery for easing COVID-19 restrictions.  With the health and safety the top priority, a number of procedures and measures have been implemented which are aligned with state and federal government guidelines to ensure visitors, museum officers, volunteers and the behind the scenes team remain safe.

national motor museum

Discover how motor vehicles have opened up our country, linking some of the most isolated communities in the world. From the stately to the absurd, from the hand-built to the mass-produced, see the vehicles people loved and loathed, thrashed and pampered, in the pursuit of their motoring dreams!

The South Australian Maritime Museum in Port Adelaide, and the Migration Museum in the city will follow, opening at 10am Friday 5 June 2020, in time for the June long weekend.

For more on how the National Motor Museum is keeping visitors and volunteers safe:

motor.history.sa.gov.au/coronavirus

 

Opening hours:

10am – 5pm everyday (from June 3)

Closed Good Friday & Christmas Day

Location:

Shannon Street, Birdwood

motor.history.sa.gov.au

Images: Andre Castellucci Photography

Coronavirus restrictions lifting: What Step 2 looks like for families

Coronavirus restrictions lifting: What Step 2 looks like for families

child soccer pitch

The great success South Australia has achieved in flattening the Coronavirus curve means that our state government and Chief Medial Officer have the confidence to gradually and carefully lift the restrictions in South Australia.

The government this week announced step 2 of restriction lifting will be brought froward to Monday 1 June. But what does this look like for families, how does this change what we can do? We’ve got the break down below.

Cinemas, theatres, galleries and museums

family at cinema

Can we go to the cinema or theatre?

Yes, from 1 June cinemas and theatres will be re-opening.

All persons attending are required to provide their name and phone number or email address. The cinema retains a record of those contact details and produces them at the request of an authorised officer.

Maximum capacity will be 20 people in any single room (cinema) or 80 for the place as a whole.

Note: People employed, engaged to work, or undertaking official duties, are not counted in the total number of people present.

Can we go to an art gallery or museum?

Yes, from 1 June art galleries and museums will be re-opening.

All persons attending are required to provide their name and phone number or email address. The gallery retains a record of those contact details and produces them at the request of an authorised officer.

Maximum capacity will be 20 people in any single room or 80 for the place as a whole.

Note: People employed or engaged to work, or undertaking official duties, are not to be counted in persons present on premises.

Can we go to the drive-in?

Yes. Drive-ins re-opened on Friday 22 May.

Outdoor sport (including sports training), fitness or recreation activities

soocer kids

Can we recommence football training with contact?

Yes. From 1 June, outdoor contact sports training (such as football) can recommence.

When can contact sports competition resume?

From 25 June, outdoor contact sports can resume.

Can we open our change rooms at our sports club?

No. Communal changing rooms, shower facilities are not permitted to be used and must remain closed.

Note: Toilet facilities are permitted to be open.

Can a clubhouse be open and have spectators watching from there?

Yes. Dining in a clubhouse and watching sport on an adjacent oval is permitted. You could have up to 80 people dining and another 80 people playing and/or watching sport at the adjacent oval.

People present must not exceed more than 1 person per 4 square metres and the 1.5 metres social distancing must be adhered to.

Can we go to the public swimming pool?

Yes. All types of water activities at the swimming pool are permitted as long as the following requirements are complied with:

1. No swimmer at the premises is accompanied by more than 1 caregiver who is not swimming; and
2. The total number of persons in any swimming pool at the premises does not exceed one person per 4 square metres, up to a maximum of 20 persons per pool.

Can I do water aerobics at the pool?

Yes, provided that the total number of people in the group does not exceed 20 and the density requirement is complied with.

Contact indoor sport

kids basketball

When can indoor contact sports such as basketball or martial arts commence?

Indoor contact sports training is permitted on and after 25 June, as long as the number of participants does not exceed 20.

Sports training prior to 25 June, you can train but must ensure there is no contact or only accidental.

Non-contact indoor sport

When can indoor non-contact sports such as indoor cricket resume?

Before 25 June, indoor non-contact sports training can take place as long as any contact is only accidental and as long as the number of participants does not exceed 20.

Any sports competition that is non-contact or involves only accidental contact can recommence on and after 25 June.

Indoor fitness

kids dance

Can my kids attend dance classes? 

Yes, but classes or activities at gyms, health clubs, fitness centres, community halls, yoga, barre, spin facilities, and dance and pilates studios are limited to a maximum of 10 participants (1 person per 4sqm, not including staff).

Hospitality (restaurants, cafes, wineries, pubs, breweries, bars)

family dining

How many patrons can be in a restaurant/café/winery/pub/brewery/bar?

A maximum of 80 patrons across all dining areas whether enclosed or outdoors with a maximum of 20 in each dining area.

People present must not exceed more than 1 person per 4 square metres and the 1.5 metres social distancing must be adhered to.

Note: People employed or engaged to work, or undertaking official duties, are not to be counted in persons present on premises.

Can patrons eat at the bar?

No. Food and beverages (including alcohol) may only be consumed by patrons while seated at tables that are physically separate from any bar or other area that’s used for taking orders.

There is more than one indoor dining area at the establishment, how many patrons can they have?

If an establishment has multiple rooms and an outdoor area then as an example you could have 3 rooms inside the building with up to 20 people seated in each room and another 20 people dining in the outdoor area.

People present must not exceed more than 1 person per 4 square metres and the 1.5 metres social distancing must be adhered to.

Do I have to buy a meal to go to the pub for a drink?

No. From 1 June, you can go to the pub for a drink and not be required to buy a meal. However, alcoholic beverages must be consumed while seated at tables that are physically separate from any bar or other area that’s used for taking orders.

People present must not exceed more than 1 person per 4 square metres and the 1.5 metres social distancing must be adhered to.

Do my friends and I have to be “social distanced” when dining at a restaurant?

Tables within the premises must be at least 1.5 metres from each other but people who arrive together and are seated together as a group can be seated less than 1.5 metres from each other.

If a restaurant is at maximum capacity, can others waiting for takeaway outside the restaurant?

Yes, as long as the 1.5 metres social distancing is adhered to.

 

For more information about the SA government road map to lifting Coronavirus restrictions:

 

sa.gov.au

Virtual reality app for teens living with asthma and anxiety

Virtual reality app for teens living with asthma and anxiety

augmented reality teen

Augmented reality helps teens with asthma tackle anxiety, head on

For many teenagers the fear of an asthma attack can sometimes be as confronting as the actual condition. Research has found that they’re twice as likely to experience anxiety and depression. Now an augmented reality app is aiming to ease those fears.

In a push to curb increasing rates of poor mental health among our Aussie kids, new research from the University of South Australia is trialling the next-gen technology of augmented reality (interactive, computer-generated experiences overlaid across real-world environments), in the hopes that it could help teens take control of their mental health.

In Australia, one in seven children aged 4 to 17 years experience a mental health condition in any given year. Children with asthma are twice as likely to develop comorbid anxiety and/or depression, making them a high-risk group for poor mental health.

Lead researcher, UniSA’s Kelsey Sharrad, says the research hopes to show how augmented reality can enhance iHealth CBT resources to concurrently improve asthma and symptoms of anxiety among teenagers.

“CBT is a first-line psychological therapy that uses practical, task-based processes to teach kids how to recognise and cope with feelings of anxiety,” Sharrad says.

“Its success rate is more than eight times those of other therapies, but despite the known advantages, only 20 per cent of kids who could benefit from treatment are accessing it.

teenager iphone

iHealth for Anxiety and Asthma

“Interactive technologies and personal devices such as iPhones, are a drawcard for most teenagers, so by developing novel iHealth solutions using augmented reality, we’re hoping to increase the appeal and engagement rates of CBT.

“In turn, we expect kids to interact more regularly with the technology, which will ultimately deliver positive impacts for their mental and physical health.”

Targeting 13 to 17-year-olds who have symptoms of anxiety and asthma, the study will compare the health outcomes of two groups: one using a paper-based CBT guidebook (the platform and launching pad for the augmented reality content), plus a self-help smartphone app; and the another using only the self-help smartphone app.

After four months, the research team hopes to show that teenagers using the augmented reality iHealth resources will have used the tools more frequently and for longer sessions, leading to reduced symptoms of anxiety, improved lung function and asthma control, and overall, a better quality of life.

A pilot study by the same research team previously delivered positive results to show how augmented reality iHealth resources consistently improved the accurate use of asthma inhalers among patients.

“One of the greatest benefits of augmented reality is its ability to put the user at the centre of the experience, which increases their motivation to engage and learn,” Sharrad says.

“CBT is already very person-centred and flexible, but by adding augmented reality, we’re increasing its appeal, personalisation and access for many more Australian teenagers in need.”

 

 

 

Big Brother is coming… and these are our picks!

Big Brother is coming… and these are our picks!

big brother is coming

Big Brother is back!

And the countdown is on…

It’s been twenty years since nine people entered a purpose built house to be watched 24/7 by Big Brother and broadcast on national television, and after a six year hiatus, Big Brother is set to return to our screens in less than two weeks.

Promising a dynamic new house full of new surprises, new rules and show-stopping twists, Big Brother is watching, and so will we be!

Channel 7 has been slowly revealing the identities of the 2020 contestants, and here are a couple of our favourites.

Mum of two and teacher, Zoe

As a woodwork teacher and a mum, Zoe is used to taking charge. We mums are pretty accustomed to having every move we make watched (even when we’re in the bathroom!) so we think Zoe will fit right in in the Big Brother house.

80’s Aerobic Icon, Marissa

This 61-year-old makeup artist and fitness expert plans to lie low but come out on top. With her TV history, ability to make bold moves and be flexible, we think she’s one to watch!

Office boss and mum, Angela

She’s a boss in the office and a mum at home; if she can cope with kids and coworkers, we think she’s got a fair shot of whipping 19 housemates into shape!

Outback tradie, Mat

From Broken Hill to the Big Brother House, country boy Mat is playing to win. Let’s see if this tradie can win Australia’s hearts too.

Big Brother 2020 is due to premiere this June on Channel 7.

To meet the rest of the contestants, visit:

7plus.com.au/big-brother

@bigbrother

 

HAS Foundation increasing awareness of Paediatric Palliative Care

HAS Foundation increasing awareness of Paediatric Palliative Care

Ella Stratton HAS foundation

For families of children living with life limiting conditions, time is precious. Making the most of every moment is vital.

This week is National Palliative care week and Adelaide charity, the HAS Foundation, are putting their hearts and hands towards increasing awareness of paediatric palliative care, something that is often forgotten as palliative care is so commonly associated with the elderly.

With the official slogan of the week being ‘Palliative Care….it’s more than you think’, Ella Stratton, Founder of the HAS Foundation and mum to three boys, is encouraging the general public to think about the families of children that are devastatingly going through the palliative care process. Within Adelaide, there is no hospice for paediatric palliative care, and quite often families are at home caring for the critically ill children.

stratton family

Ella understands first-hand the heartbreak of losing a child, and the deep meaning behind creating beautiful lifelong family memories by capturing moments of fun and laughter, even in times of struggle and heartache.

The Hunter Alfred Stratton (HAS) foundation was created in honour of Ella and Jarrod Stratton’s son Hunter, to support and help families who are going through the experience of having a sick child in palliative care, in creating happiness and memories of a lifelong love.

The Foundation, with the mission to provide ongoing financial and emotional support to children with life limiting illnesses and their families, has significantly contributed to a number of palliative care projects for Adelaide’s Women’s & Children’s Hospital.

“It is quite sad that a lot of people aren’t aware that Paediatric Palliative care is a thing,” says Ella. “These families are going through what no parent ever wants to imagine…they need support, and we are using this week to raise awareness of this fact.”

has foundation bag

The Foundation undertakes a number of key activities, providing essential support to the Paediatric palliative care team at the Women’s & Children’s Hospital. Not only do they put together bespoke care packs covering every member of the family, they have helped fund a renovation in the hospital viewing room, have financially contributed to a purpose built palliative care friendly holiday house.

“The support provided to our family by the palliative care team at the Women’s & Children’s Hospital was instrumental,” says Ella. “We finally had the support that helped lift the weight of caring solely for Hunter off our shoulders – it was then shared with experts who knew a journey we had not yet walked”.

Palliative care… it’s more than you think.

 

Hunter and Ella Stratton

More information on the work that the HAS Foundation does can found on the website

hasfoundation.org.au

As always, donations to the Foundation as most welcome.